Two Important Launches: Amazon MatchBook and Oyster

Two pieces of major exciting news for the book industry was announced this month!

First, Amazon is launching a new program called MatchBook in October 2013. The program will allow you to also get the ebook edition of any participating printed book you purchase through Amazon (past or future), for $2.99 or less (or even for free!).

This is incredibly important for a couple of reasons:

  1. Consumers that want to convert their library to digital format can do it now
  2. This increases sales numbers for an industry that has been suffering
  3. It actually supports printed book sales. Consumers may opt to just purchase the hardback since they know they can grab the ebook version as well (especially if it’s free!)

Not to be overshadowed, a new mobile reading platform called Oyster is launching the beta version of their iPhone app and has received lots of hype! Oyster has been dubbed “The Netflix for Books”, and for $9.95 a month you get unlimited access to over 100,000 titles from various participating publishers.

If this receives early success (as I expect it will), more and more publishers will flock to them and offer to add their books to their content library. This could be a game changer for the book industry, and will certainly keep it alive. You can read more about this start up venture here.

I’m calling it right now: This needs to be a strategic acquisition by Barnes & Noble if they expect to stay afloat and compete against Amazon.
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Tips for Writing a Novel While Working a Full-Time Job

The largest and most critical issue that impacts one’s ability to write a novel is time. So when you hold down a full-time job and have a family, making your commitment to writing can be difficult to say the least. In addition, we all know that both reading and writing every day increases our skill, however, what if you don’t have time to do both? In my case, I work on average 45-50 hours a week, I go to grad school at night two days a week, I have homework, tests to study for, projects and research papers, plus I have a wife and two little girls. There isn’t time to both read and write in a single day; I must choose one or the other. So I’ve come up with some helpful tips to share with others about how I’ve found the time to write a novel.

First, wanting to write a novel requires raising it up on your list of priorities. Trying to find time to write everyday will be especially challenging if it has to compete with all the other activities and past-times that you would rather do. If that isn’t enough, try asking yourself, “What are you willing to sacrifice to be able to do all the things that you want to do in a day?” For me, I sacrifice sleep. I only do 6 hours a night.

Second, do everything you can to mobilize your writing. I use the free CloudOn app on my iPad to edit Microsoft Office docs that I keep in Dropbox/SkyDrive. I also made the move to a Windows Phone because it has Microsoft Office built in, and can edit docs stored in SkyDrive. All of these things have helped me to capture my thoughts as soon as I have them, and allow me to utilize any downtime (like waiting in a doctors office) toward making progress on my novel. Alternatively, if mobilizing your writing isn’t for you, then bring a book with you wherever you go (digital or print) and use the downtime throughout your day to read as much as possible.

Third, set a realistic expectation for yourself. Think about how much you should be writing a month. Do you know what your average word count is for your chapters? Do you know what your estimated word count for your novel is? 50,000? 70,000? 100,000? Try to do the math so that you can finish your novel within a year or less.

Words Per Year Goal Words Per Month Words Per Week Words Per Day
60,000 5000.0 1153.8 164.4
70,000 5833.3 1346.2 191.8
80,000 6666.7 1538.5 219.2
90,000 7500.0 1730.8 246.6
100,000 8333.3 1923.1 274.0

Fourth, just write. Don’t self-edit until the end. Get the words onto the page so that you can flush out the entire story. Save editing and revisions for later.

Here’s a Writer’s Digest article that adds some other suggestions: 5 Ways to Maximize Your Time